November 21, 2014

majestic beauty - towering above it all


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photo by Donald Kinney

Early morning, looking east from Big Rock at Lucas Valley.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Late afternoon, looking south from Hawk Hill above the Golden Gate.


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November 20, 2014

symbolic colors -- of a primary nature


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photo by Donald Kinney

This colorful flag of clouds flew--although briefly--early Monday morning above our beloved Mount Tamalpais.



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photo by Donald Kinney

From a few years ago--colored light on the scalloped side of Coit Tower. White; signifies purity and innocence.
Red; hardiness and valor.
Blue; vigilance, perseverance and justice.


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November 19, 2014

Fiery sunrises


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photo by Donald Kinney

Golden-yellow on a background of blue.



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Red, orange, and yellow; plus a bit of fire.


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November 18, 2014

Big sky


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photo by Donald Kinney

 


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November 17, 2014

designs on low water


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photo by Donald Kinney

Afternoon clouds and setting sun over Elephant Mountain.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Enough angles and gradient differences to make a photographer happy.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Everybody calls it "the lake", but a fertile valley near Nicasio in west Marin County was flooded here in the 1950's to create an emergency storage reservoir. We've been in that emergency for the past 3 years.


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November 16, 2014

Autumn comes to Marin


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photo by Donald Kinney

Their demise had been expected, and their age was definitely the cause. Unable to withstand wind and the added weight of light rain, leaves dropped, well, like leaves.



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photo by Donald Kinney

With the drought, not much in the way of Montbretia blooms this year. Sword-shaped leaves have been standing by patiently.



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Montbretia (a.k.a.: Crocosmia) blossoms in a previous year.


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November 15, 2014

Redwood grove on Ridgecrest Blvd, Mt. Tamalpais


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photo by Donald Kinney

Low spot on the long ridge, in the moist pathway of foggy clouds.



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As you might know, Redwood trees get a substantial amount of water by absorbing it through their needles and pumping it to other parts of the tree.


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November 14, 2014

Inverness -- on Tomales Bay


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Inverness is located on the west shore of Tomales Bay, which runs southeast along the line of the San Andreas Fault. Surrounded by Point Reyes National Seashore, it is primarily a small residential community, with little industry other than tourism.

The region became the property of James Shafter, who began to develop the property in the 1890s. It became a summer resort where people from San Francisco and Oakland came to camp, hike and swim in Tomales Bay. Many built small summer cabins that still exist today. Small steamboats took excursions down the bay to secluded beaches. They left from Brock Schreiber's boathouse, which has been preserved and is a prominent local landmark with its prominent sign "Launch for Hire".



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The town is a 15 miles or so to the east from Drake's Bay on the Pacific Ocean, named after Sir Francis Drake, who explored the coast in the 16th Century. Although Drake's official log was lost, the ship's doctor's log described landing in an area that reminded him of the White Cliffs of Dover. Drake's Bay is backed by similar-looking cliffs, leading many to believe this beach is where Drake's ship landed.   source: Wikipedia






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November 13, 2014

Nature meets City


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photo by Donald Kinney

The shallow Nicasio Reservoir waits for rain. We've been getting a smattering here and there...



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photo by Donald Kinney

The City doesn't wait for anyone or anything, including ominous clouds.



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Hustle and bustle in the distance. A plethora of people slaving away.
Many--I'm sure, would enjoy being elsewhere; like the shoulder of Mt. Tamalpais, where I snapped this photo.


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November 12, 2014

Marin color -- right there, can't miss it


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photo by Donald Kinney

With west Marin valleys already filled with low fog, this is the view to the north from the ridge of Mount Tamalpais at sunset.



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Breakfast is looking good on the farm. Plenty of Shredded-Wheat on-hand.


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November 11, 2014

moon and sun -- basic features in the sky


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photo by Donald Kinney

Eight-ball-in-side-pocket moon...



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photo by Donald Kinney

Candy-apple red setting moon...



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A blazingly large sun, obscured by a bit of fog.


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November 10, 2014

framing up a sunrise at San Quentin Village


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photo by Donald Kinney

Within 100 yards of the main gate at San Quentin is a delightful overlook of San Pablo Bay and the Richmond Bridge. Not far below is a very cool beach that--I'm guessing--goes unused by the 4,223 prisoners incarcerated nearby.



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Eucalyptus trees can be quite full of art in their old age. They aren't native to this area but seedlings were brought in great numbers from Australia. Great claims were made for their usefulness; many did not live up to expectations. This tree grows fast and straight, but has a tendency to split as it dries, making it unsuitable for construction projects and furniture.
In the 1850s, Eucalyptus trees were introduced to California by Australians during the California Gold Rush. Much of California has a similar climate to parts of Australia. By the early 1900s, thousands of acres of eucalypts were planted with the encouragement of the state government. It was hoped that they would provide a renewable source of timber for construction, furniture making and railroad ties. It was soon found that for the latter purpose eucalyptus was particularly unsuitable, as the ties made from eucalyptus had a tendency to twist while drying, and the dried ties were so tough that it was nearly impossible to hammer rail spikes into them.  source: Wikipedia


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November 09, 2014

fog buffeting the Golden Gate Bridge


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photo by Donald Kinney

afternoon,



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photo by Donald Kinney

the next afternoon,



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and evening.

Oh by the way; good article about fog and fog-horns


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November 08, 2014

Richmond Bridge -- from San Quentin Village


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photo by Donald Kinney

earlier...



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and a bit later, after 344 snaps.


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