October 26, 2011

Mount Whitney and Lone Pine Peak


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photo by Donald Kinney

Yesterday I was showing Ansel Adams' gnarly rocks that had eluded me for so many years, but this image was taken in the same spot--I just panned the camera 90 degrees to the right.

Lone Pine Peak is on the right, and Mount Whitney is just barely visible in this image towards the left.



click photo for full-size image
photo by Donald Kinney

Late afternoon in the Sierra. That's Mount Whitney on the left. The dark rocks are part of the Alabama Hills in the Tuttle Creek area.

Going back 50 years ago when I was a mere whipper-snapper of 14, I was privileged to join my aunt and uncle on a Mount Whitney backpacking adventure. Unfortunately we were prevented in reaching the summit of Mount Whitney--14,191 feet and the highest spot in the Continental United States--due to a horrendous storm that unleashed it's fury on us during our night stay at Whitney Outpost Camp at about 11,000 feet.



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photo by Donald Kinney

A better view, perhaps, of Mount Whitney.



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photo by Donald Kinney

And again, a shot of Lone Pine Peak, which is often confused with Mount Whitney itself. As I mentioned yesterday, this area has appeared as a backdrop in hundreds of wild-west movies and shorts. Bang-bang, you're dead!


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2 comments:

Levonne said...

I really like photos 2 and 3. 3 is my favorite!

AphotoAday said...

Hi LEVONNE -- Thanks for the input and I like that third image too. The fall colors couldn't have been prettier.

 
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